CURATOR

Fondation Vincent van Gogh Arles


Pierre Joseph

DOC
26, rue du Docteur Potain, 75019, Paris, France

Solo Show


20.10 – 12.11.2018


Artist


Pierre Joseph


Curator


Arthur Fouray


Text


Pierre Joseph (born in Caen, 1965, lives and works in Paris) tells at DOC a simple story. The exhibition Fondation Vincent van Gogh Arles follows the lineage of rural scenes painted during the XIXth century by Vincent van Gogh and Jean-Francois Millet. After his show Hypernormandie at La Galerie Noisy–le–Sec, he virtually explores a science–fiction sequel of the impressionists’ works.

He parasitizes keywords, hashtags, bluring yet clarifying the possible leads of his solo show. Pierre Joseph plays with the codes of normative mythologies, of a technological society obsessed by an organic & natural ideal. He was triggered by the exhibition La Vie Simple – Simplement la vie / Songs of Alienation by Bice Curiger and Julia Marchand at Fondation Vincent van Gogh Arles in 2018. La Vie Simple sought to decipher the relationship of artists in keeping with a natural way of life. Displacement of a real context to a temporary exhibition, Fondation Vincent van Gogh Arles sets the tone.

Are we “Rue du Docteur Fanton” or “rue du Docteur Potain” ? This keyword slide, here a landslide brings us to a potato field. A XXIst century potatoe field. Storage, industrial potatoes display, Fondation Vincent van Gogh Arles takes us to a “Rungis” (International Market) aisle. Almost communist in the constancy of the photographs and their subjects, this presentation lays the idea of a potato, simple, naked, peeled of any qualifier. Some germs and the pinkish tone of their film punctuate the dried dirt surrounding potatoes. The tiny details are as many focal points inside this potatoes cosmos to highlight a simple truth: potatoes.

How to disconnect the subject from any political, social, ideological, historical issue, in order to convey the “potato” object in the most modest fashion ? Pierre Joseph digs the perspective of a simple potato. He looks for the direct and trivial attitude of XIXth century painters when they painted peasants, fields, meals, still lives. Today, with this accelerated information overflow, the task is, precisely not so simple. Just search for hashtags “#potatoes”, “#spuds” (and their variations, including Esperanto) on social networks or search engines to understand the abundance and diversity of the starchy crop vocabulary. The exhibition is built with and thanks to the potato. From the starch that fixes the image on film to the starchy paste that links the forty–five “endless photographs” to DOC’s wall. Pierre Joseph restricts the vocabulary in order to discern specific categories, clear intentions.

The potato, the seriality, the contextual shift. All these components blend together and genuinely generate the experience of the exhibition in an extended space–time setting. Today or in 10 years, here or somewhere else, Pierre Joseph presents us a living ecosystem that has developed since the start of the project, that is expressed during the time of the exhibition and that will be altered tomorrow.

Arthur Fouray


Acknowledgment


Air de Paris
Florence Bonnefous
Jérémie Bonnefous
Julie Boukobza
Elsa Carnielli
Lauren Coullard
Bice Curiger
Philippe Decrauzat
Nicolas Degrange
Fondation Vincent van Gogh Arles
Maja Hoffmann
Julia Marchand
Édouard Merino
Ana Mendoza Aldana

Mark

Artist 


Greffes

Villa Médicis, Rome, Italy

16.11 – 23.11.2017

Group Exhibition

Artists

Alfredo Aceto – Achraf Touloub – Landon Metz – Mohamed Namou, Marco Basta – Lupo Borgonovo, Davide Bertocchi – Samon Takahashi, Gabriele De Santis – Felice Levini, Alberto Di Fabio – Lucian Indrei – Ciprian Mureşa, Christophe de Rohan Chabot – Arthur Fouray, Edgars Gluhovs – Timothy Furey, Lise Stoufflet – Romain Vicari, Nicola Pecoraro – Fabio Quaranta

Curator

Pier Paolo Pancotto

WORKS with Christophe de Rohan Chabot (b. 1986)

senza titolo / (X5m4mjB–1) (aaafff)
2017 (Paris)
dibon, canvas, acrylic, braces, dark glass
67.5cm x 30cm x 12cm
Courtesy of Gaudel del Stampa & Galerie Joy de Rouvre & Christophe de Rohan Chabot & Arthur Fouray

senza titolo / (X5m4mjB–1) (aaafff) ’’
2017 (Paris)
dibon, canvas, acrylic, braces, dark glass
67.5cm x 30cm x 12cm
Courtesy of Gaudel del Stampa & Galerie Joy de Rouvre & Christophe de Rohan Chabot & Arthur Fouray

Acknowledgment

Alfredo Aceto, Paolo Caravello, Arthur Godard

CURATOR

BREAK (FEAST)
Lauren Coullard
Silicon IVIalley, Prilly, Switzerland

15.09 – 12.11.2017

Solo Exhibition

Artist

Lauren Coullard

Curator

Arthur Fouray

TEXT

Lauren Coullard: The Lucky Stories

Sometimes we’re lucky, sometimes small unforeseen miracles happen in the sinuous course of life. One of these was my meeting with Lauren Coullard, and almost immediately afterwards with her art, at about the exact moment it was starting to get born. Shortly then a new miracle – these were sumptuous times : Lauren Coullard started to paint. Suddenly, on the table, as airdroped from an invisible country where these sort of serene fireworks had been nicely waiting to hatch, Lauren Coullard’s first paintings. Just like that.

If the world was paying more attention to what matters, it would have done the same thing as we did: watch, admire, silently applause, and whisper our admiration, carefully making sure that she was not hearing too much, to let her do what she does best: paint, without listening to anybody’s opinion, because the truth is that no one has anything to tell her about what she should or should not to do. After all, she's an artist.

The following months and years have been and keep being a long way of recurring delights, everytime appear the modest and zigzagging epiphanies of joy, color, and personal narrative patterns rising with more or less density depending on the periods: characters in nature, human activities, vegetations, a few horses, or brillantly talented portraits that deconstruct the human face to rebuild it with only what amuses or intrigues the painter, resulting in small wonders of relevance, humor, pictorial accuracy and vital energy. Or recently, abstract signs on splendid large size canvas, made of color, peace and joy, quick like scribbles, but with the perfection of color harmonies.

Because, in fact, the supposed antinomy between abstraction and figuration, as some oppose body and soul, besides being a tremendous reduction of the reality of painting, finds one more proof with Coullard that in the end, whether you recognize people or apples or cats in it, or you only see lines and tones, it is always, more or less, stories that are told or that fly around, with some more obvious and some more subtle. Which is why sometimes everything finds itself mixed up with everything, boundaries get blurred by the brush, we see something, and what is it? Well finally it is color, it’s movement, oil paint, a brush stroke: nothing more, and nothing less.

Stories, she has plenty, and today she’s telling us one more at Silicon: in BREAK(FEAST), we are, you are, in a cereal bowl! And following a daydreaming reference to eighteenth century’s porcelain bowls having decorative patterns painted on the inside, here comes a beautiful wall frieze with dragons, as seen from inside this very bowl. And then, because a daydream bounces on one another, arise the memories of Mexican cereal boxes: photos of the Mexican boxes are printed and then pasted on the French ones, these collages are painted, and voilà: cereal boxes in the big cereal bowl, paintings in the installation, or maybe just a large painting that is also a large cereal bowl. Daydream’s pool ball bounces again on an elegance phantasy about the nineteenth century, catches sight of Dorian Gray, and here it is: Wilde’s hero’s taking his breakfast, or has taken it earlier, or maybe he is just about to take it – anyway, look right here: embroidered with his initials, he kindly left us his napkin.

The little ballet is in place, it is up to us now to dance.

Jérémie Gransenne

Acknowledgment

AQNB, Grégoire Bolay, Frédéric Gabioud, Jérémie Grandsenne, Paul Nicoué, Sooishi, Baker Wardlaw

Artist


Artist


Arthur Fouray


Curators


Yasmin Afschaf
Katrin Weilenmann


Text


Arthur Fouray (b. 1990) combines the approaches of major, opposing twentieth–century avant–garde art movements in his work: readymade, Minimal and Conceptual Art, as well as monochrome painting. He also studies current developments in–depth and it is these wide–ranging points of reference that provide the basis for his artistic concepts.

In his CARAVAN exhibition the Lausanne–trained artist places his works in the foyer of the Aargauer Kunsthaus, literally at the interface of interior and exterior space. The glass façade designed by Herzog & de Meuron is the starting point for his site–specific intervention in which he plays with the architectural situation of the foyer as well as its use as a place of encounter. The artist covers the museum’s front with curtains made of cotton that are painted bright red. This material was first used by the Abstract Expressionists in the U.S. and competed with linen canvas as the classic picture support.

Arthur Fouray’s diverse reference system is evident not just on a formal level: oftentimes the names of artists who served as inspiration for a work are, in fact, mentioned explicitly. His window installation Torres (Pyrrole) was inspired by a group of works by the Cuban artist Félix Gonzalez Torres (1957 – 1996). In the 1980s, Torres arranged light–blue curtains in an exhibition space; called Untitled (Loverboy), theyallude to the romantic relationship of two men. For Fouray, too, the fabric panels are a means of staging. Torres (Pyrrole) is preceded by a work from the aaafff series. This combination of letters refers both to the artist’s initials and to the shade of colour featured in many of his works, which in the computer–based colour identification system used by Fouray stands for a precisely defined light violet blue. The painting shows on one side the titular colour hue, while its other side is covered by a mirror. When the visitor steps in front of the latter, the glass façade becomes a stage and the viewer becomes the protagonist of this mise–en–scène.

INTERFACE. WELCOME TO A FELIX ROOM ♥: with these words in the present booklet Arthur Fouray provides the motto for his installation. He invites us into a spatial structure that is both confined and porous and in which the curtain and objects function as interfaces between two systems. Felix refers not just to the aforementioned artist, but also means “happy” or “lucky” in Latin. The heart icon on the back stylises this positive message.

Yasmin Afschaf
Katrin Weilenmann


Works




aaafff 2.0 (U)

2017 (Paris)
mirror, acrylic, cotton duck, plywood
81cm x 183cm x 20.5cm
Courtesy of Aargauer Kunsthaus & Galerie Joy de Rouvre & Arthur Fouray
Torres (Pyrrole)

2017 (Paris)
acrylic, cotton duck, props
165cm x 455cm x 7cm
Edition /6
Courtesy of Aargauer Kunsthaus & Galerie Joy de Rouvre & Arthur Fouray
Andy (Pyrrole)

2017  (Paris)
acrylic, cotton duck, pillow
30cm x 40cm x 8cm
Edition /50
Courtesy of Aargauer Kunsthaus & Galerie Joy de Rouvre & Arthur Fouray


Acknowledgments


Marielle Chabal
César Chevalier
Lauren Coullard
Marine Coullard
Philippe Decrauzat
Madeleine Schuppli
Aargauer Kunsthaus Museum Team



Arthur Fouray

arthur@arthurfouray.art

55 Boulevard de la Villette
75010, Paris, France



Copyright © 2019 Arthur Fouray. All rights reserved.